Kansas Lobby Days a Success

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The American Cancer Society’s Kansas Lobby Day brought
more than 80 of the organization’s volunteers, staff and survivors from across Kansas to
the state capitol in Topeka
on Wednesday, Feb. 4.
Participants met with their local legislators to discuss cancer issues
important to all Kansans.

            The day kicked off with a
legislative briefing for volunteers and staff at the Senate Suites, followed by
visits to the House and Senate Chambers at the Capitol.

            A top priority this legislative
session is Senate Bill 25, a clean indoor air bill. The bill was recently
introduced and would protect Kansans from secondhand smoke in workplaces and
other public areas. The Kansas Department of Health and Environment estimates
290 Kansans die each year from the effects of secondhand smoke exposure.
Multiple independent studies confirm
no significant economic impact to business when clean indoor air laws are
adopted.

            Another of the key legislative goals
for the American Cancer Society is to generate support for the Colon Cancer Screening
Assurance Bill, which advocates screening for colon cancer according to the
American Cancer Society guidelines. The passage of House Bill 2075 would assure
that all state regulated insurance companies cover life-saving colon screening
tests in accordance with American Cancer Society guidelines.
Access to routine cancer screenings
is critical to detecting many cancers in their early and most treatable stages. It is the third
leading cause of cancer death among men and women.
When detected
early through screening tests, colon cancer is more than 90 percent curable.
Late detection, when the cancer has spread to other parts of the body, leaves
little room for hope–and only a 10 percent chance of survival.

            In addition, funding for the “Free
to Know” Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program is a key agenda
item that volunteers will be discussing with legislators.

            Missouri staff, volunteers and survivors
will have a chance to speak with their legislators on March 31, 2009 at the
Missouri Lobby Day.  Ask your staff
partner for more information to come!

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